Caffeine and Alzheimer’s Disease

Caffeine is the most widely consumed by the majority of people all over the world. A new case of Alzheimer’s disease is tentatively diagnosed once a minute in the USA. Study after study has proven that caffeine can have a positive effect on brain function. Indications are that there is a very strong link between the use of caffeine and improvement in the thought and memory processes. In fact, some aspects of the study indicate that people who regularly consume caffeine may actually be protecting themselves from developing Alzheimer’s. There has been a great deal of proof provided by basic research as well as epidemiological studies to show that caffeine may be very helpful in preventing the dementia and cognitive decay that are associated with Alzheimer’s Disease.

It is estimated that a new case of Alzheimer’s disease is tentatively diagnosed once a minute in the USA. The term “tentatively” is used because the only way to truly diagnose Alzheimer’s disease is through autopsy. Nonetheless, the tremendous frequency of the incidence of this debilitating condition is reason for alarm as our population of baby boomers continues to age. According to a report in May 18, 2010 issue of Science Daily, a new Portuguese study suggests that caffeine may be helpful in slowing the ravages of Alzheimer’s disease and rebuilding cognition.

A team of international experts on the topic of Alzheimer’s was assembled for the purpose of looking into how caffeine affects the brain. Several studies were generated that gave a broad variety of viewpoints on the subject. The study was led by by Rodrigo A. Cunha, of the University of Coimbra and Alexandre de Mendonça of the University of Lisbon, both located in Portugal

Study after study proved that caffeine can have a positive effect on brain function. One study showed that people who drank lots of coffee had lower incidence of Parkinson’s disease, while another study showed that moderate caffeine consumption had a positive effect on the cognitive decline that comes with Alzheimer’s. The results of these studies were verified with animal studies. Another, conducted with animal subjects, showed that caffeine is helpful in preventing the degeneration of the central nervous system as well as motor defects.

Among some of the most important new concepts that emerged from these studies are the fact that caffeine can be good for the brain and can slow degeneration. It can slow down the production of plaques in the brain, which lead to Alzheimer’s disease. It helps reverse and reduce some of the symptoms of Alzheimer’s. Caffeine was proven to increase both performance and cognition in tests of mental ability.

In addition to the empirical study, following the patients with Alzheimer’s through activities of daily living revealed that caffeine helped improve the quality of the patients’ lives and make living with dementia easier because it acted as a mood lifter. Alzheimer’s is frequently accompanied by depression.

The initial findings of this groundbreaking research indicate that there is a very strong link between the use of caffeine and improvement in the thought and memory processes. In fact, some aspects of the study indicate that people who regularly consume caffeine may actually be protecting themselves from developing Alzheimer’s.